Staff Profiles

Professor Oluwatoyin Dare Kolawole

OD Kolawole

Okavango Research Institute

Professor

Location: Main Research Building, Room 31
Phone: +267 681 7248; 7230 2491
Email Professor Oluwatoyin Dare Kolawole

  • PhD (Agricultural Extension & Rural Sociology), Ife, Nigeria 
  • MSc (Agricultural Extension & Rural Sociology), Ife, Nigeria 
  • MA (Development Studies), Sussex, England 
  • Bachelor of Agriculture (Honours), Ife, Nigeria 
  • Ordinary Diploma (General Agriculture)

Oluwatoyin (Toyin) Dare Kolawole is Professor of Rural Development at the Okavango Research Institute (ORI), University of Botswana (UB) in southern Africa. Professor Kolawole is an Adjunct Faculty at Eastern University based in St Davids, Pennsylvania, USA. Working at the interface of science, policy and agriculture in Africa, his research interests are in Development Studies with emphasis on agrarian change. He has published well over 100 papers covering diverse development subjects in reputable outlets. A UC Visiting Canterbury Fellow in 2014, Dr. Kolawole is a recipient of over 30 academic awards and research/travel grants and has led and managed a number of multi-disciplinary, pro-poor development research funded both locally and internationally. He has attended over 50 regional/international conferences and workshops in Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America, and the Oceania. In 2016, the Lesotho’s Council for Higher Education (CHE) appointed him as chairperson of the panel of experts that reviewed the B.Sc. Agricultural Economics Programme of the National University of Lesotho (NUL) and a member of experts that reviewed the B.Sc. Agricultural Extension Programme of the NUL in of 2017. Prof. Kolawole is a verified peer reviewer for several well recognized scientific journals published by Taylor & Francis, Routledge, Springer and Elsevier. He is a member of the Editorial Board of SAGE Open and International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food.

  • Rural Development
  • Politics of knowledge/Indigenous knowledge
  • Rural entrepreneurship development and employment promotion
  • Sustainable agriculture
  • Diffusion studies
  • Climate variability and change
  • Adult literacy
  • Environment and Development   

  • Climate change and agriculture
  • Rural entrepreneurship development and employment promotion 
  • Diffusion studies
  • Indigenous knowledge and development 
  • Adult literacy
  • Community development 
  • Community based natural resources management
  • Poverty, inequality and unemployment
  • Rural development
  • Water resources management 
  • Development studies 

 

 

  1. Kolawole, O.D. (2019). Science, social scientisation and hybridisation of knowledges, Science as Culture 28(3), pp. 391-401. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/09505431.2019.1645825
  2. Noga, S.R., Kolawole, O.D., Thakadu, O.T. and Masunga, G. (2018). ‘Wildlife officials only care about animals’: Farmers’ perceptions of a Ministry-based extension delivery system in mitigating human-wildlife conflicts in the Okavango Delta, Botswana, Journal of Rural Studies 61, pp. 216-226 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrurstud.2018.06.003
  3. Kolawole, O.D. (2015). Twenty reasons why local knowledge will remain relevant to development, Development in Practice 25(8), pp. 1189-1195. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09614524.2015.1078777
  4. Kolawole, O. D. et al. (2016). ‘Climate variability and rural livelihoods: how farming households perceive and adapt to climatic shocks in the Okavango Delta, Botswana’, ​​​​​Weather, Climate, and Society 8(2), pp. 131–145. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/WCAS-D-15-0019.1 

In pursuit of academic excellence